F O O M
oh, marie antoinette!
A blog honouring everyone's favourite decadent Queen.
vivelareine:


The day when we bade good-bye to our nurses, we also bade good-bye to childish things, and were handed over to tutors and governesses to be moulded into the most approved patterns of deportment. We were supposed never to question anything, but merely to become clever automata …
It was always the same; we were not educated, for ourselves, but merely to live in the eyes of the world; our young lives were sacrificed to position, and we were not supposed to possess any individuality or display any emotion.

—Archduchess Louise of Austria, ‘My Own Story.’
[image: Louise of Austria dressed as Marie Antoinette, via Internet Archive Book Images]

vivelareine:

The day when we bade good-bye to our nurses, we also bade good-bye to childish things, and were handed over to tutors and governesses to be moulded into the most approved patterns of deportment. We were supposed never to question anything, but merely to become clever automata …

It was always the same; we were not educated, for ourselves, but merely to live in the eyes of the world; our young lives were sacrificed to position, and we were not supposed to possess any individuality or display any emotion.

—Archduchess Louise of Austria, ‘My Own Story.’

[image: Louise of Austria dressed as Marie Antoinette, via Internet Archive Book Images]

vivelareine:

I don’t know what these etchings of Maria Theresa pulling up Marie Antoinette in a well mean, but, here are two.

[credit: © The Trustees of the British Museum]

vivelareine:

The royal family’s experience of August 10th, 1792, as recounted by Marie Thérèse Charlotte:

… We crossed the garden of the Tuileries in the midst of a few National guards, who still remained faithful. On the way we were told that the Assembly would not receive my father. The terrace of the Feuillants, along which we had to pass, was full of wretches, who assailed us with insults; one of them cried out: “No women, or we will kill them all!” My mother was not frightened at the threat and continued her way. At last we entered the passage to the Assembly. Before being admitted [to the hall] we had to wait more than half an hour, a number of deputies still opposing our entrance. We were thus kept in a narrow corridor, so dark that we could see nothing, and hear nothing but the shouts of the furious mob. My father, my mother, and my brother were in front with Mme. de Tourzel; my aunt was with me, on the other side. I was held by a man whom I did not know. I have never thought myself so near death, not doubting that the decision was made to murder us all. In the darkness I could not see my parents, and I feared everything for them. We were left to this mortal agony more than half an hour.At last we were allowed to enter the hall of the Assembly, and my father on entering said [in a loud voice] that he came to take refuge with his family in the bosom of the Assembly, to prevent the French nation from committing a great crime. We were placed at the bar, and they then discussed whether it was proper that my father should be present at their deliberations. They said, as to that, that it was impossible to let him stay at the bar without infringing on the inviolability of the sovereign people; and they declaimed speeches thereon which were full of horrors. After this they took us into the box of a journalist.… we witnessed the horrors of all kinds which there took place. Sometimes they assailed my father and all his family with [the basest and most atrocious] insults, triumphing over him with cruel joy; sometimes they brought in gentlemen dying of their wounds; sometimes they brought my father’s own servants, who, with the utmost impudence, gave false testimony against him; while others boasted of what they had done. At last, to complete the revolting scene, they brought in the Host and flung the sacred wafers on the ground. It was in the midst of these abominations that our entire day, from eight in the morning until midnight, passed [as one may say] through all gradations of whatever was most terrible, most awful.

vivelareine:

The royal family’s experience of August 10th, 1792, as recounted by Marie Thérèse Charlotte:

… We crossed the garden of the Tuileries in the midst of a few National guards, who still remained faithful. On the way we were told that the Assembly would not receive my father. The terrace of the Feuillants, along which we had to pass, was full of wretches, who assailed us with insults; one of them cried out: “No women, or we will kill them all!” My mother was not frightened at the threat and continued her way. At last we entered the passage to the Assembly. Before being admitted [to the hall] we had to wait more than half an hour, a number of deputies still opposing our entrance. We were thus kept in a narrow corridor, so dark that we could see nothing, and hear nothing but the shouts of the furious mob. My father, my mother, and my brother were in front with Mme. de Tourzel; my aunt was with me, on the other side. I was held by a man whom I did not know. I have never thought myself so near death, not doubting that the decision was made to murder us all. In the darkness I could not see my parents, and I feared everything for them. We were left to this mortal agony more than half an hour.

At last we were allowed to enter the hall of the Assembly, and my father on entering said [in a loud voice] that he came to take refuge with his family in the bosom of the Assembly, to prevent the French nation from committing a great crime. We were placed at the bar, and they then discussed whether it was proper that my father should be present at their deliberations. They said, as to that, that it was impossible to let him stay at the bar without infringing on the inviolability of the sovereign people; and they declaimed speeches thereon which were full of horrors. After this they took us into the box of a journalist.

… we witnessed the horrors of all kinds which there took place. Sometimes they assailed my father and all his family with [the basest and most atrocious] insults, triumphing over him with cruel joy; sometimes they brought in gentlemen dying of their wounds; sometimes they brought my father’s own servants, who, with the utmost impudence, gave false testimony against him; while others boasted of what they had done. At last, to complete the revolting scene, they brought in the Host and flung the sacred wafers on the ground. It was in the midst of these abominations that our entire day, from eight in the morning until midnight, passed [as one may say] through all gradations of whatever was most terrible, most awful.

peremadeleine:

Royalty Meme ♛ [1/7] Pairings
Louis XVI & Marie Antoinette

Maria Antonia, the daughter of Empress Maria Theresa of Austria, became the Dauphine of France when she married Louis Auguste, grandson of Louis XV, in 1770. The marriage was intended to cement an alliance between Austria and France and was somewhat unpopular at the French court. Though Antoinette was sweet and charming, her new husband was shy and somewhat reserved. Despite their striking differences—Louis was tall, bookish, and introverted while Antoinette was petite, fun-loving and personable—they eventually became close friends.

In 1774, Louis Auguste was crowned Louis XVI after his grandfather died. Though the new king and queen’s relationship was an affectionate one, it would still be nearly three years before the marriage was finally consummated. In 1778, Antoinette gave birth to their first child, a daughter they named Marie-Therese Charlotte. They went on to have three more children—two sons, Louis Joseph and Louis Charles, and a short-lived daughter, Sophie-Helene Beatrice. Both Louis and Antoinette were devoted parents. Though Antoinette’s sex life was the source of much gossip and speculation, most evidence suggests that she and Louis were loving, faithful partners. 

In the summer of 1789, the Dauphin Louis Joseph died shortly before the storming of the Bastille. Though his parents were devastated, they were now in the midst of revolution. That fall, the royal family was forced to move from Versailles to Paris. Desperate to regain control of the country, they attempted to flee to Austria in 1791, but were stopped in Varennes near the border. The remaining goodwill of their people dissolved. What remained of Louis’ royal power also dissolved over the course of the next year and a half, leaving his family veritable prisoners in Paris.

The National Convention declared an end to the monarchy in the fall of 1792. Shortly thereafter, he taken from from his wife and children and put on trial for treason. He was found guilty and executed by guillotine in January the following year. Antoinette, whose health was failing and who was now called the “Widow Capet,” was devastated by his death. Her children were separated from her during the summer of 1793, and in October, she was also put on trial for treason. She, like her husband, was executed just days after the trial.

artschoolglasses:

Inside the queen’s bedchamber at Versailles.

artschoolglasses:

Inside the queen’s bedchamber at Versailles.

My place is here, with my husband.

vivelareine:

Versailles
[image:  © EPV / Th. Garnier]

vivelareine:

Versailles

[image: © EPV / Th. Garnier]

the-garden-of-delights:

"Marie Antoinette at the spinet" (1768) by Franz Xaver Wagenschön (1726-1790).

the-garden-of-delights:

"Marie Antoinette at the spinet" (1768) by Franz Xaver Wagenschön (1726-1790).

artschoolglasses:

The ornate bed in the Queen’s Bedchamber at Versailles.

artschoolglasses:

The ornate bed in the Queen’s Bedchamber at Versailles.

artschoolglasses:

Bust of Marie Antoinette in the Queen’s Bedchamber.

artschoolglasses:

Bust of Marie Antoinette in the Queen’s Bedchamber.

artschoolglasses:

Louis XVI style chair in the Cabinet de la Vaisselle d’Or.

artschoolglasses:

Louis XVI style chair in the Cabinet de la Vaisselle d’Or.

queenrhaenyra:

→ Marie Antoinette + Scenery

stephaniedelannoy:

"It may be considered politically unwise, but it seems to me to be the general wish and I want to be loved"